Learning Styles Survey

Student Learning Style Survey

Thanks to Saginaw Valley State University for the Learning Styles Survey,Score Report, and Learner Profiles.

Survey

Question Most Like Me Least Like Me
1.  Making things for my studies helps me to remember what I have  learned. 4 3 2 1
2.  I can write about most of the things I know better than I can tell about them. 4 3 2 1
3.  When I really want to understand what I have read, I read it softly to myself. 4 3 2 1
4.  I get more done when I work alone. 4 3 2 1
5.  I remember what I have read better than what I have heard. 4 3 2 1
6.  When I answer questions, I can say the answer better than I can  write it. 4 3 2 1
7.  When I do math problems in my head, I say the numbers to myself. 4 3 2 1
8.  I enjoy joining in on class discussions. 4 3 2 1
9.  I understand a math problem that is written down better than one  that I hear. 4 3 2 1
10.  I do better when I can write the answer instead of having to say it. 4 3 2 1
11.  I understand spoken directions better than written ones. 4 3 2 1
12.  I like to work by myself. 4 3 2 1
13.  I would rather read a story than listen to it read. 4 3 2 1
14.  I would rather show and explain how something works than write  about how it works. 4 3 2 1
15.  If someone tells me three numbers to add, I can usually get the  right answer without writing them down. 4 3 2 1
16.  I prefer to work with a group when there is work to be done. 4 3 2 1
17.  A  graph or chart of numbers is easier for me to understand than  hearing the numbers said.  4 3 2 1
18.  Writing a spelling word several times helps me to remember it  better. 4 3 2 1
19.  I learn better if someone reads a book to me than if I read it silently  to myself. 4 3 2 1
20.  I learn best when I study alone. 4 3 2 1
21.  When I have a choice between reading and listening, I usually read. 4 3 2 1
22.  I would rather tell a story than write it.  4 3 2 1
23.  Saying the multiplication tables over and over helps me  remember them better than writing them over and over. 4 3 2 1
24.  I do my best work in a group. 4 3 2 1
25.  I understand a math problem that is written down better than one I  hear.   4 3 2 1
26.  In a group project, I would rather make a chart or poster  than gather the information to put on it.  4 3 2 1
27.  Written assignments are easy for me to follow.  4 3 2 1
28.  I remember more of what I learn if I learn it alone. 4 3 2 1
29.  I do well in classes where most of the information has to be  read. 4 3 2 1
30.  I would enjoy giving an oral report to the class. 4 3 2 1
31.  I learn math better from spoken explanations than written ones. 4 3 2 1
32.  If I have to decide something, I ask other people for their  opinions. 4 3 2 1
33.  Written math problems are easier for me to do than oral  ones. 4 3 2 1
34.  I like to make things with my hands. 4 3 2 1
35.  I don't mind doing written assignments. 4 3 2 1
36.  I remember things I hear better than things I read. 4 3 2 1
37.  I learn better by reading than by listening. 4 3 2 1
38.  It is easy for me to tell about the things I know. 4 3 2 1
39.  I make it easier when I say the numbers of a problem to myself as I work it out. 4 3 2 1
40.  If I understand a problem, I like to help someone else understand it , too.  4 3 2 1
41.  Seeing a number makes more sense to me than hearing a  number. 4 3 2 1
42.  I understand what I have learned better when I am involved  in making something for the subject.  4 3 2 1
43.  The things I write on paper sound better than when I say them. 4 3 2 1
44.  I find it easier to remember what I have heard than what I have  read. 4 3 2 1
45.  It is fun to learn with classmates, but it is hard to study with them. 4 3 2 1

Score Sheet

Visual Language 
5   --  ____ 
13 --  ____ 
21 --  ____ 
29 --  ____ 
37 --  ____ 
Total  ____ x 2 =___(Score) 
Individual Learner
4   --  ____ 
12 --  ____ 
20 --  ____ 
28 --  ____ 
45 --  ____ 
Total  ____ x 2 =___(Score) 
Auditory Numerical 
7   --  ____ 
15 --  ____ 
23 --  ____ 
31 --  ____ 
39 --  ____ 
Total  ____ x 2 =___(Score) 
Visual Numerical 
9   --  ____ 
17 --  ____ 
25 --  ____ 
33 --  ____ 
41 --  ____ 
Total  ____ x 2 =___(Score) 
Group Learner
8   --  ____ 
16 --  ____ 
24 --  ____ 
32 --  ____ 
40 --  ____ 
Total  ____ x 2 =___(Score) 
Kinesthetic -Tactile 
1   --  ____ 
18 --  ____ 
26 --  ____ 
34 --  ____ 
42 --  ____ 
Total  ____ x 2 + ___(Score) 
Auditory Language 
3   --  ____ 
11 --  ____ 
19 --  ____ 
36 --  ____ 
44 --  ____ 
Total  ____ x 2 =___(Score)
Expressiveness - Oral 
6   --  ____ 
14 --  ____ 
22 --  ____ 
30 --  ____ 
38 --  ____ 
Total  ____ x 2 =___(Score)
Expressiveness - Written 
2   --  ____ 
10 --  ____ 
27 --  ____ 
35 --  ____ 
43 --  ____ 
Total  ____ x 2 =___(Score)
     Score: 
33-40 =
Major Learning Style 
20-32 = Minor Learning Style 
5  -20 = Negligible Use 
 

 


Tell Me More about My Own Learning Style

Click on the link below that best describes YOU as a learner to find a list of tips to help you learn more easily in the classroom.

Visual Language

These students learn language skills by sight, mainly by reading and watching.  They tend to be fast thinkers, to gesture freely while talking, and to communicate very clearly and concisely.  They learn well from demonstration process -- must see to understand.

Student Activities:

Use a calendar to list due dates, dates to begin assignments, and test dates.

Your study environment should be clutter free, away from windows and movement.

Skim text material before going to class. 

Highlight and write as you study.  Use different colors to select and organize.

Always take notes during lecture.

Make class notes visual with drawings, spacing, symbols, etc.

Use text visual such as charts and pictures.  To build recall, practice reproducing them on a piece of paper.

Use study cards with written information organized into outlines, drawings, or diagrams.  Review them by writing to reproduce the information.

Make your recall cues as visual as possible.  Use capital letters, colors, illustrations.

Recall information for exams by visualizing text pages, notes, or study cards.

If permitted, make notations on text questions.  Underline key words, or draw what you find difficult to understand.

Visual Numeric

These students do better with numbers when they see them written.  They must see to understand, learn best by reading and writing, and tend to be fast thinkers.

Student Activities:

Use a calendar to list due dates, dates to begin assignments, and test dates.

Your study environment should be clutter free, away from windows and movement.

Highlight and write as you study.  Use different colors to select and organize. Highlight novels and take notes in the margins when possible.

Always take notes during lecture.

Make class notes visual with drawings, spacing, symbols, etc. Use capital letters and colors, too.

Use text visuals such as charts and pictures.  To build recall, practice reproducing them on a piece of paper.

Use study cards with written information organized into outlines, drawings, or diagrams.  Review them by writing to reproduce the information.

Auditory Language

These students learn best by listening. 

 Students Activities:

Study in a quiet place.  Eliminate background noise by quietly playing classical music or an environmental sound track.

Skim text or related material before going to class.

Attend all lectures.

Read or recite aloud as you study.

Take notes or use a tape recorder to record lectures.  Play recorded notes when commuting by car.

Note-taking in class will require a great deal of focus.  You may need to compare your notes to a classmate’s to make sure you wrote down all the information given.

Study with a friend or study group.  Explain information in your notes to another person.

Talk to yourself when you study.  Describe diagrams and practice answering test questions out loud.

Recite study card notes into a tape recorder, and play the tape back for repeated practice.

When solving problems, talk yourself through each step.

"Chunk" test questions, and recite each part to yourself silently in your head.

Auditory Numeric

These students are better with numbers when they can hear them spoken. 

Student Activities:

Study in a quiet place.  Eliminate background noise by quietly playing classical music or an environmental sound track.

Skim text or related material before going to class.

Attendance in class is crucial because you learn best when you hear the information.

Read or recite aloud as you study.

Take notes or use a tape recorder to record lectures.  Play recorded notes when commuting by car.

Study with a friend or study group. 

Talk to yourself.  Describe diagrams and practice answering test questions out loud.

Recite study card notes into a tape recorder, and play the tape back for repeated practice.

When solving problems, talk yourself through each step.

"Chunk" test questions, and recite each part to yourself silently in your head.

Kinesthetic/Tactile

These people are feeling and touch oriented, good at hands-on tasks, good linguists, and very sensitive to others' feelings.  They learn best by doing and moving.  Good ways to learn are hands-on projects, or experiments, writing down the information and applying it to real-life situations.  They may have difficulty sitting for long periods of time.

Student Activities:

Use as many of your senses as possible when you study:  sight, hearing, touch, taste, smell.

Move around or walk when you study.  Chew gum while you study  at home or squeeze a rubber ball.

Put as much as you can on index cards.  Lay cards out on the floor in various locations to organize them, and practice reciting them as you move around the room.

Carry index cards with you everywhere, and use them whenever you have to wait.

Study in small, frequent chunks.  Give yourself breaks and rewards.

Use a timer, and decide on an amount of time you feel you can effectively sit and work.  Underestimate, and work up to longer periods if possible.  When the timer sounds, take a break and do something physical.

Set a goal for the amount of information you will cover, such as five pages.  Take a break when you reach your goal.

For short term learning, use a mnemonic device called the methods of place (loci).

Study with other kinesthetic persons.  Their gestures and activities may give you additional input.

When solving a problem, move around and manipulate items to represent parts of the problem.

When taking an exam, remember what you did physically as you studied.

Individual Learner

These students prefer to study on their own.

Student Activities:

Study in a quite place.  Eliminate background noise by quietly playing classical music or an environmental sound track.

Skim text or related material before going to class.

Class attendance is crucial.

When needing assistance, work one-to-one with peer tutor rather than study in groups.

Group Learner

These students learn best by interacting with a group.

Student Activities:

Study with a friend or classmate.

Attend study group sessions.

Organize your own study group. 

One of your challenges each day is to go to class, sit at your desk, and get ready to focus on what the teacher’s agenda for the day is. Your first impulse will be to socialize with friends sitting nearby instead of finding out what class tasks you might  need to complete.

Oral Expressiveness

Means how well student expresses him/herself.  These students usually do well in speech classes.

Student Activities:

Attend all lectures.

Take notes.

Read or recite aloud as you study.

Study with a friend or study group. 

Explain information in your notes to another person.

Talk to yourself.  Describe diagrams and practice answering test questions out loud.

When solving problems, talk yourself through each step.

"Chunk" test questions, and recite each part to yourself silently in your head.
 

Written Expressiveness

This means how well students express themselves in writing.

Student Activities

Skim text material before going to class. 

Highlight and write as you study.  Use different colors to select and organize.

Always take notes during lecture. 

To build recall, practice reproducing information on a piece of paper or chalkboard.

Use study cards with written information organized into outlines, drawings, or diagrams.  Review them by writing to reproduce the information.

When testing, do an "information dump" on blank sheet or back of test pages (if permitted).  Write down formulas, outlines, mnemonics, learning cues, etc.  Use these to expand ideas for writing.  "Right brain" learners may use mapping techniques for organized thoughts before writing.

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the survey will not let me click on anything to take it